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چاپ

A review of the approval of the 1970 WMO (World Meteorological Organization) Congress shows that Iran, as a member of this international Organization, committed itself to take action towards establishment of Agrometeorology. Consequently, based on national needs, Iran established in 1975 an Agrometeorological section in the civil Meteorological Organization. For the first time ever in the history of this national Organization, it is taking measures to hold training courses in the field of Agrometeorology. Simultaneously, it is studying, on an expert basis, the entire country in order to identify agricultural regions for the purpose of setting up Agrometeorological stations.

A review of the approval of the 1970 WMO (World Meteorological Organization) Congress shows that Iran, as a member of this international Organization, committed itself to take action towards establishment of Agrometeorology. Consequently, based on national needs, Iran established in 1975 an Agrometeorological section in the civil Meteorological Organization. For the first time ever in the history of this national Organization, it is taking measures to hold training courses in the field of Agrometeorology. Simultaneously, it is studying, on an expert basis, the entire country in order to identify agricultural regions for the purpose of setting up Agrometeorological stations.

Subsequently a manpower training schedule was drawn up and time-tabled programs established for the education of experts and lower personnel needed for 18 Agrometeorological stations. Their headquarter section in the Organization became operational in 1979 under supervision of Iranian and foreign instructors (the so called Kwanta Project). Despite the feasibility of manpower training of this Agrometeorological section, the programs for set up and equipment of stations and establishment of residential regions failed to be carried out in time, due to incorrect implementation. The project came in 1980 across administrative/executive difficulties and obstacles, halfway its completion. About 60% of the personnel of the stations (comprising 18 experts and 36 lower personnel) were suddenly dispatched to the central administration instead of to the stations.

The Meteorological Organization and the Kwanta Project pursued the issues slowly and failed to manage the implementation of training courses. The continuation of the activities of consulting Engineers of the Kwanta Project and Romanian Consulting Engineers were left in suspension and then stopped. Practical training of Agrometeorological personnel of the stations did therefore not take place at all and other defined activities, including theoretical education, were not implemented.

At this juncture, in 1981, the management of the network that had been in charge of running the climatological and pluviometric stations failed to cope with the 18 agrometeorological stations. Many personnel were inevitably dispatched to synoptic stations, for which work they had not been trained. Agrometeorological experts were reduced to the level of very ordinary inspectors.

Under these conditions, in spite of lack of management and official responsibility, but rather on the initiative of the towns concerned and through the personal efforts of experts in Agrometeorology, early stations such as Ekbatan were constructed. Merely out of expert interest and motivation as well as out of individual, moral commitments, some instruments were supplied and research activities started. This way, in 1982 the earliest Agrometeorological research stations were set up in Iran, by energy of many personnel in creating incentives for officials and directors unfamiliar with this field of work.